The festival culture is at the cutting edge of a world where transformation seems inevitable…and the visionary painters of this thriving art scene create wings for the heart to sail over the precipice of doom, carrying viewers into the interweaving web of life.  Through both sacred geometric tendrils and sci-fi mechanical integration, the lineup of painters at Sonic Bloom this year – curated by Michael Garfield and displayed in the gorgeous gallery by the Colorado Alliance of Visionary Artists – was second to none. Exposure to this much concentrated talent is sure to imprint a deeper awareness upon anyone who encounters it…

Check out this amazing video by producer Chris Bohlin, celebrating the live art, gallery, structural installations, workshops, and other offerings that made Sonic Bloom 2014 such an overflowing bounty:

Sonic Bloom is a supremely busy event, a “blooming, buzzing confusion” with a huge site map and multiple amazing things going on at every moment pulling fans in all directions. I wasn’t able to interview the whole visionary art team – about half of the world-class lineup isn’t represented here (you can find links for everyone on the official festival website). But every chance I had to speak with someone was inspiring – every one of them was generous with their time and would be glad to share their insights with you, reader…

[Check out the entire Sonic Bloom 2014 Visionary Art Line-up here.]

Art by Randal Roberts

Randal Roberts

At thirty years old Randal took a workshop with Alex Grey and had a breakthrough in his life, suddenly he was able to make a living as painter.  With no formal training in painting he quit his job at IBM and went on a 1 year tour where he started calling himself an artist from which he never came back. Early on his pieces were maps for psychedelic journeyers but got to a point where he didn’t want to encourage indulgence so he began to focus more on natural patterns that are found in nature. He paints from the perspective that nature forms are what God is…

Art by Morgan Mandala

Morgan Mandala

Morgan’s journey as a visual artist began as a child in Chicago, and throughout years of different jobs, studies, and travel, art was the thing that remained a constant in her life.  After wanting to explode with images and messages when she arrived back from Peru, and then asked to live paint a number of times, she fell into the wonderful web of support and inspiration of the festival community. An overall theme of her paintings involves trying to illustrate the synthesis of multi-dimensional realities within the physical world. Similarly to music, visual art uses a language free of words for all to interpret.  The crowd, music, artists, and community at a festival all influence a live painting. This allows the painting to become a visual recording of the experience that is seen and created from multiple perspectives. She also sees visual art as an influential tool in the festival community that can be used to spread positive messages, inspire collaboration, and give people another outlet for creative expression and discovery of the Self…

Art by Dela

DeLa

Dela moved to San Francisco three years ago after living as an artist in Florida. Psychedelic art has always been close to his heart., but once in San Francisco he discovered Ritual Night Club, which featured a painting temple, and on his first night there he sold four original pieces – so it wasn’t long before he was California festival scene. His work contains fine technical detail, layering explosive color on a black and white photo aesthetic. The inspiration for his work is to promote environmental awareness, our connection to the cosmos, the beauty of the feminine, and humility – as this moment is here then gone…

Art by Michael Garfield

Michael Garfield

Michael doesn’t remember when he started making art but his mom tells him he was drawing dinosaurs at age two. It took a few years of being a professional artist for him to become comfortable with calling himself one. While studying with philosopher Ken Wilber at the Integral Institute, he stumbled across Alex Grey’s The Mission of Artwhich provided the catalyst for him to start taking seriously visionary arts motivation and intention to heal. What distinguishes his work isn’t so much the style (although he may be the only live painter to use paint pens exclusively) but the intention that goes into each painting.  He tries to paint images that resonate with the spirit of the moment not to capture but to make explicit the energies that inform the event energy of the collective participants…

Art by Krystleyez

Krystleyez

Krystleyez’s journey as an artist began the moment before birth. Since she was little her grandmother and mother encouraged her to express herself. Visionary art is something she was already creating when she found other individuals also expressing consciousness through symbols, mythology, and the woven-ness of the subtle energy realm.  The message she conveys in her art is the interconnectedness of everything through sacred geometry, balance of masculine and feminine. She plays with fluidity and structure in both the collective and individual. It is her intention to create a feeling of expansive space that reminds the viewer of meditative states…

Art by Adam Psybe

Adam Psybe

Adam has been drawing and painting his whole life. At a young age he became a fan of H.R. Giger and Alex Grey through the album art of psychedelic rock band Tool. He has always been into dark psychedelic media and likes to draw from evolving complexity, physics, computer science and sci fi illustrations. What he tries to convey in his work is that the world is becoming increasingly complex at an exponential rate and we need to be ready to cross the threshold into the machine…

Art by Rae Vena

Rae Vena

Rae started off at a young age writing stories and making pictures to go along with them. She always knew she was an artist. In high school she did a lot of painting. After graduation she attended college for a short while, but dropped out to live in a van and tour the festival scene. Inspired by travels, dreams, love nature, lots of rainbows and universal love, she would always paint on the ground, but one day she stood up with an easel and suddenly people wanted to take her pieces home with them…

Art by Andy Reed

Andy Reed

Andy has always been interested in art but didn’t take it seriously until 2008, when he got involved with traveling and selling friends’ art work at shows by bands like STS9 and EOTO. His paintings play with an organic flowing balanced by structures of geometry – he prefers to keep his work subjective.  What makes live painting special to him is how it engages people; the audience gets to see the piece unfold over days and can witness the emotional thought process of the painter…

Art by Tyler Ristow

Tyler Ristow

For Tyler drawing was always an escape from school which was filled with boring repetitive acts, and he didn’t want to make it his work.  His path to becoming a visionary painter started at STS9 shows painting hats – from there he got into canvas and acrylic.  He draws inspiration from other artists, space, dreams, medicine, Native American culture, cities, and unfamiliar landscapes. Each of his paintings has its own message…

Art by Chance Roberts

Chance Roberts

Chance’s painting “Mercury Rising” is a good example of how his work reflects his environment and from where the muse pulls his brush. In “Mercury Rising” he took the clearest picture of Mercury ever captured and used Photoshop to crop his friend on both sides, as if he were Atlas holding Mercury upon the planes that exist between. His work draws inspiration from his environment, and many of the models he uses for his paintings are close friends. What he tries to capture in his works are individuals in their best light…

Art by Miranda Lewis

Miranda Lewis

Miranda was constantly sick as a child and one of the things she used to deal with the prolonged time resting and the frustrations of not being well enough to go outside was art. She didn’t realize it yet, but it was the beginning of a journey incorporating art as her healer. She holds a deep belief in the healing powers of art and creativity. Art soothes, helps organize her thoughts and move beyond her obstacles. She wants people to do everything in their power to help themselves be good and feel safe and make good choices. According to her, art should be beautiful, thought provoking, inspiring. This is what she aims to create…

Art by Andrew Thompson

Andrew Thompson

The CAVA gallery at Sonic Bloom was the first gallery Andrew ever helped set up and it was a great learning experience. What he found as the biggest challenge was not knowing the exact design and amount of supplies needed. He believes that galleries and live paintings are very important to the festival culture because they provide a grounded yet elevated experience while providing space for a check point to converse and catch one’s breath. In his work he embeds as much mystery as possible. As he works he lets the paint choose its own direction and tries to honor every brush stroke, taking care to bring each one out…

Art by Jade Amazon

Jade Amazon

Before Jade could talk he could draw. For a long time he felt like his work was suffering on the technical side and he decided to focus on his health and cultivating his mental self.  As his health became better he saw his painting progress. As he pursued a more spiritual path he  easily fell into realm of visionary art. Once on the path he decided to attend the Vienna Academy of Visionary Art.  The theme of his art is the threshold point where one shifts into destiny. His work is all about acceptance and integrating polarities.  While painting he pours intention into each stroke and can’t claim them as his own…

Art by Patrick Beery

Patrick Beery

As long as Patrick can remember he has been drawing and painting. He started performing live art around sixteen at folk and blues bars. Since then he still performs as much as possible and has expanded into tattooing and graphic design, as well as video and VJ endeavors.  His works usually deal with a darker side of nature.  He believes that it is always important to embrace your darker side, as it makes the beautiful things that much brighter. His work also heavily draws on the American Western experience and history, as it resembles our own Wild West frontier of technology. With much of the music of the scene not having vocals, the art work gives narrative and meaning to what people are hearing…

Art by Matthew Fredericey

Matthew Fredericey

Matthew sketches out his vision as fast as possible leaving space for improvisation. His intention is to remind internal souls that reality is alive and we are connected to it.  He feels he was predestined before birth to be a painter. It was on a psilocybin mushroom journey that he was gifted a transformational experience and he knew he had to give his gift to the world in the name of love. He paints with the knowledge that art transforms consciousness…

Art by Skaadi

Skaadi

Sakadi’s mom set him down with crayons and coloring books just like you. While at Daytona State College he picked up the airbrush, his first thought was, “This thing needs UV ink inside of it.” He wrote and directed a theatrical dance performance that year; that dance performance was the birth of the Black Brush Air Light. He believes art has been a part of the celebratory gathering for a really long time. The Dionysian celebration surrounding winter solstice of the ancient Greeks is a prime example. Also, he imagines that the cave drawings of Lascaux, France were not executed like a Bob Ross public access tutorial, but more like an inspirational half-time locker-room speech. The origin of art was meant to get you pumped. It’s at festivals for the same reason it has always been at Greek theaters, buried in ancient caves, spray painted on train bridges or hanging in white-wall-galleries: the aid in the progression of having you really, REALLY feel something…

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